Confidentiality

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The Therapeutic Relationship

Research has shown that a huge factor in the efficacy of Hypnotherapy (and talk therapy in general), is the relationship that develops between the client and therapist, which should be built on a foundation of trust. Another important factor is that the therapist is able to adapt to and accept the client’s personal characteristics, culture and views on the world. This doesn’t mean that they always have to agree, but that the therapist will not judge the client and will always presume good intent. This is the way that I always work with my client's, so I can ensure you that you can trust me fully and will never be judged by me.

Confidentiality

Everything that you discuss within therapy is completely confidential from your initial contact, apart from in some specific circumstances which I will outline below.

I abide by the ethical framework of the NSTT and the CNHC which require me to have regular supervision with an accredited supervisor. Therefore, in order to provide you with the best care, I may discuss your case with my supervisor.

My clinical supervisor will also have access to your details in case I am suddenly unavailable to contact you, or offer ongoing care.

There are some important exceptions where confidentiality must be breached, listed below under ‘Requirements for disclosure’.

What you can talk to me about

It’s natural that you might be concerned about whether it is ok to tell me certain things. Below are some issues that you might wonder about but are absolutely fine to discuss with me.

  • Disturbing thoughts, wishes or dreams

  • Self-harm or suicidal thoughts or attempts

  • Abuse (physical or emotional, present or past)

  • Embarrassing or unhealthy habits

  • Alcohol or drug use

  • Sexual issues

Requirements for Disclosure

Having given examples of some things that you can discuss with me, it's important that you know that the law forbids our normal confidentiality if:

  • I become aware of information which I either know or believe might help prevent another person carrying out an act of terrorism, or might help in bringing a terrorist to justice in the UK, or about specified activities related to money and property used to assist terrorist activities.

  • I observe physical signs that an act of female genital mutilation may have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18 or I am informed by a girl under the age of 18 that she has undergone an act of female genital mutilation.

  • The police request information about the driver of a vehicle at the time of an offence - it must be disclosed by me as failure to do so would constitute a criminal offence on my part.

  • I become aware of drug trafficking or money laundering that may be required to be reported under the Drug Trafficking Act 1994, Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 or the Money Laundering Regulations 2007, if this happens, I may seek legal advice as to any statutory duty.

  • I must disclose information that I am ordered to by a court or by a statutory request for access to personal data made under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018.

I may also break our normal confidentiality if I become aware (or have good reason to suspect) that you have knowledge of:

  • A past, present or future incident/situation that may be dangerous or harmful to you, another adult or a child and that is not known to the relevant authorities.

  • Future or past criminal activity that has not been resolved in law. This means any criminal activity, of which the relevant authorities are either unaware or a case they know about which they consider not to be closed (provided you do not present information in therapy which would reasonably re-open the case). This does not include parking or traffic offences unless there is intent, by you or anyone else, to cause danger to yourself or others, or that it is deemed to be a serious offence.

 

In such circumstances, I will work with you to see if we can work together to make appropriate disclosures. For our purposes a serious offence is: ‘Murder, manslaughter, rape, treason, kidnapping, child abuse or other cases where individuals have suffered serious harm or there is serious harm to the security of the state or to public order and crimes that involve substantial financial gain and loss.'